Jazz : A Film By Ken Burns

November 6, 2014 - Comment

From the creator of The Civil War, Baseball and many other acclaimed documentaries comes this epic series celebrating that most American of art forms, jazz. From its blues and ragtime roots through swing and into bebop and fusion, the growth of jazz is charted as you watch 75 interviews, more than 500 pieces of music

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From the creator of The Civil War, Baseball and many other acclaimed documentaries comes this epic series celebrating that most American of art forms, jazz. From its blues and ragtime roots through swing and into bebop and fusion, the growth of jazz is charted as you watch 75 interviews, more than 500 pieces of music and rare, unseen photos and footage! 10 DVDs. 2001/b&w/19 hrs/NR/fullscreen.

Product Features

  • Brand Name: PARAMOUNT HOME VIDEO Mfg#: 841887051255
  • Shipping Weight: 1.52 lbs
  • Manufacturer:
  • Genre: TV
  • All music products are properly licensed and guaranteed authentic.

Comments

Darin Brown "revolver13" says:

The good, the bad, and the ugly I think I understand the viewpoints of BOTH the harsh critics and the fanatical supporters of this series. Both have valid points. Both “sides” sometimes fail to understand the points of the other “side” (or fail to even try). Here, I’ll try to explain why I think both viewpoints are legitimate.Briefly, what are the good vs. bad qualities of this series?GOOD: Music is often blended extremely well with visual material. There is much great music and great film footage. Anyone new to jazz will be exposed to these. Even those not so new to jazz will find interesting sounds and sights. The commentary by Gary Giddons throughout the series is unusually helpful, insightful and moderate, in contrast to some other commentators (see BAD below). The film is good at telling stories (although many of these blur into legend and myth, see below). This film will be entertaining to the general public; it will expose jazz to many people who would never have…

Eric J. Lyman says:

Jazzmataz The old saying goes that one should never talk about religion or politics in polite company. After reading several reviews about this series on this page, I wonder if jazz should be added to that list.In terms of background in the jazz genre, I fall somewhere between the wide-eyed jazz neophyte critics say this series was aimed at and the graying veteran who spends two or three nights a week listening to live fusion jazz or who rages at creator Ken Burns’ exclusion of an obscure might-be bepop avatar.And from that vantage point, I think Jazz is pretty darn good.Of course I was puzzled by some of the choices Mr. Burns made in producing this film, the exclusion of some artists and derivative movements and the time spent on others. I raised my eyebrows at the heavy reliance on Wynton Marsalis’ views and commentary, the long discussions about race, the glossing over of the modern era.My point is not to defend these aspects but only to say that it is easy to find…

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