Metal – A Headbanger’s Journey

November 6, 2014 - Comment

Anthropologist Sam Dunn decided to study the plight of a different culture, one he has been a part of since he was a 12-year-old: the culture of heavy metal. Sam sets out on a global journey to find out why this music has been consistently stereotyped, dismissed and condemned and yet is loved so passionately

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Anthropologist Sam Dunn decided to study the plight of a different culture, one he has been a part of since he was a 12-year-old: the culture of heavy metal. Sam sets out on a global journey to find out why this music has been consistently stereotyped, dismissed and condemned and yet is loved so passionately by millions. Sam explores metal’s obsession with some of life’s most provocative subjects – sexuality, religion, violence and death – and discovers some things about the culture that even he can’t defend. This documentary, the first of its kind, is both a defense of a long-misunderstood art form and a window for the outsider into the spectacle that is heavy metal. An anthropological study of Heavy Metal? Is this for real? Believe it man, it’s true, and it’s pretty darn good at that. Metal – A Headbanger’s Journey is a labor of love for director/ producer Sam Dunn; anthropologist, academia, metalhead. Like a good anthropologist Dunn has often wondered about cultures, societies, and the key elements that makes them thrive. Being a life-long headbanger, Sam Dunn decided to turn his academic skills onto himself to study and attempt to explain the often misunderstood culture that shaped his existence and millions of others around the world. Structured like a traditional anthropological journal, Metal – A Headbanger’s Journey is broken into sections such as “Origins,” “Roots,” “Environments,” “Culture,” “Sexuality,” “Religion,” and “Death.” Many topics are addressed such as identifying the first heavy metal band, what in the music defines the heavy metal sound, why heavy metal unites fans from around the world, why the music has been a target for so many watchdog groups, and who really popularized the heavy metal horn salute. For non-metalheads, the structured approach keeps the documentary on track and prevents it from getting cartoonish and too fan-based and self congratulatory. Metalheads that don’t care about film’s structure, will thoroughly enjoy the interviews of metal’s elite (including originators Tony Iommi, Alice Cooper, Dio, and Bruce Dickinson to modern day heroes Tom Morello, Rob Zombie and Lamb of God) the music, fan commentaries and the concert footage. So raise your horns up high, turn it up loud and check out the best Heavy Metal film ever made. Metal – A Headbanger’s Journey will not disappoint. –Rob Bracco

Product Features

  • Sam Dunn, a 30-year old anthropologist, decided to study the plight of a different culture, one he has been a part of since he was a 12-year-old: the culture of heavy metal. Sam sets out on a global journey to find out why this music has been consistently stereotyped, dismissed and condemned and yet is loved so passionately by its millions of fans. Along the way, Sam explores metals obsession with

Comments

Pain with no Remorse "metalhead and bass player" says:

Wow! 0

Jordan Itkowitz "Racontornado" says:

I could have watched 10 hours of this 0

Triniman "Triniman" says:

not really scholarly, but metal fans will love it From Blogcritics.org and Triniman’s Blog.Metal – A Headbanger’s Journey begins with footage from 1986 with kids gathering for a rock festival. They’re partying, playing air guitar, dressed in the proper attire of black t-shirts or no shirts at all, but most of all, they just look like they are out for a good time. But, someone is out to ruin their fun…The film switches to the September 19, 1985 Parents Music Resource Center (PMRC) Senate hearings. The group published their “Filthy Fifteen” list of songs, along with their interpretation of what the lyrics are about. Artists included Venom, Mercyful Fate, Def Leppard, Prince, Sheena Easton, Vanity, Madonna and Cyndi Lauper, among others.Looking precisely like he just left the stage, singer Dee Snider, addressed the Senate suits, including future VP Al Gore. It’s interesting to note that in part of Snider’s speech which wasn’t included in the film, he explained that he was raised a Christian and…

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